Friday, October 18, 2013

Blogging on the go

I don't have alot to say today ...well maybe because there is alot going in mind that I don't know where to start.

I attended a quite thought provoking conference in central London today. Living  in /or close to London has got its own sets of benefits .. its a quite diverse place and you are bound to find whatever that you are looking for here. As I' m off to Wales in a couple of weeks, I know I' ll definitely miss the buzz here :l I m not sure what kinda life is waiting for me outside this metropolitan city ,what the people are like etc. Hope I ll be able to work it out.

On a seperate note,using the mobile phone to blog whilst on the move is quite interesting really,don't know why I haven't tried it out before !

Monday, October 14, 2013

Eid Mubarak

'What's Eid ?'
'its the Muslims' Christmas.' ..its not exactly true but you ought to simplify things sometimes and if you are like most people , asking just for the sake of being courteous,  you know, to keep the conversation going , this is a good enough answer or what do you think ?


 keep calm and celebrate Eid !

Thursday, October 10, 2013

Electronic planners/calenders are the thing of today, but are they for me?

This year, I got yet another Samsung gadget
 the following 8 weeks I was too lazy/too busy to go downtown to get a mini SIM card for it  :O
 I have finally gathered the energy to go get one
that's the first time I go paper free Planner wise ..already excited

We all like to be over-achievers! Someone says, “achieve,” and we jump right to it. We even achieve multiple things at once (I’ll bet you’re listening to this while driving or working out—am I awesomely psychic, or what?). We make lists of projects we have to do. Then each project becomes a collection of to-do items. We add those to our to-do list. Pretty soon, we have more to-do items than Imelda Marcos has shoes—and Imelda has a lot of shoes.
It’s not easy being her. Imagine being invited to a function. She has a choice of 3,487 pairs of shoes she might wear. How does she decide? Does she organize by color? By how much toe is visible? By number of sequins? My pal Bernice would approve. Or by topological shape? Her boyfriend Melvin would love that. Or how many countries she visited in a given pair? Jet-setting Europa would go wild. It’s too hard a problem. Some theoretical mathematicians speculate solving it will take longer than the lifetime of the universe (just ask Math Dude).
Fortunately, your to-do list is a lot more manageable than Imelda’s closet. Today’s episode is a tribute to the late Steven Covey. He was the author of 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and he recently passed away at the age of much-older-than-me. I don’t know if he invented it, but he certainly popularized one way to think about choosing tasks to do. Here are some tips based upon his wisdom:

Urgency and Importance Are Different

Stephen Covey noticed that we decide a to-do is high priority in two different ways. The first is urgency. Something is urgent if it has to be done now for some reason. The dog is running in circles, crossing its legs, making whimpering noises that mean “Take me for a walk or grandma’s antique carpet is goin’ down.” Delay is not an option.
Other to-dos become high priority because they’re important. Sending in your mortgage payment, for example, needs to be done or the bank will repossess your house. Sending in that payment is high priority. (Of course, some banks repossess your house even if you don’t have a mortgage! Banking is FUN!)

Prioritize Using an Urgent/Important Grid

Make your life easier with a 2x2 grid. Label the rows Important and Not Important. Label the vertical columns Urgent and Not Urgent. Finally, label the upper left quadrant 1, the upper right quadrant 2, the lower left quadrant 3, and the lower right quadrant 4. Each quadrant is a different combination of urgent and important.

Urgent Not Urgent
Important I II
Not Important III IV
When setting priorities, decide which quadrant your activity belongs in. Then use the quadrant to prioritize the activity.

Quadrant I: Omigosh!

Quadrant I contains the urgent and important. It’s the quadrant of Omigosh-hand-me-the-fire-extinguisher. This stuff needs doing, and it needs doing now. Your top priority will be quadrant I activities. When your wife/girlfriend/surrogate baby mama/polyamorous family partner says “The contractions are two minutes apart,” it’s time to shut down World of Warcraft and head to the hospital. And no, you don’t have time to finish your current campaign first.

Quadrant II: Awesomeness

Quadrant II contains the important-but-not-urgent. It’s the quadrant of Becoming Awesome. Most of the things we need to do to become awesome are important, but not urgent. Typical activities that belong in quadrant II would include doing long-term planning, taking classes, spending time with your boyfriend, girlfriend, husband, wife, spousal equivalent, or polyamorous family unit.
Quadrant II is where most personal development activities happen: understanding your deepest values so you can orient your life around them, giving yourself true rest and relaxation so you are in top form, and recaulking the bathtub so the grout doesn’t grow legs and attack you in your sleep.
These are your next priority items, right after quadrant I. Sometimes, these can be even higher priority. If you live your life in quadrant I, always embroiled in urgent emergencies, you must visit quadrant II to create the infrastructure that will handle emergencies before they become urgent. Quadrant II is where you get the highest leverage and biggest boost to your life. It’s where you do prevention, redesign systems, and listen to the Get-it-Done Guy podcast (obviously).
Quadrant II also includes non-work stuff like building friendships, deepening ties with your family, and pursuing spirituality, meaning, and legacy. Those are rarely urgent, but they’re the most important parts of life. Do them now! Don’t wait until they become urgent.

Quadrant III: Social Media

Quadrant III is the quadrant of temptation. These are things that aren’t important, but they sure are urgent. When Bernice gets a bucket of chocolate-covered ice cream bars, I suddenly find myself in a state of near panic. “What if they melt while they’re sitting in the lunch room? I’m pretty sure the freezer isn’t working right. We have to eat these before they melt. It’s absolutely vital!”
Not-quite-emergencies often fall into quadrant III. Like social media. “Someone on Twitter just said our product sucks!!! We have to respond to this before it blows up!” Well isn’t that just a kick in the rubber parts?
It’s urgent! After all, in the 21st century, it’s all about being in conversation with our customers. But is it really important? Say you have 10 million customers and only 20,000 Twitter followers. Of the 20,000, 3 are watching their Twitter feed at the moment, because all the rest are too busy playing World of Warcraft. Doing things that are urgent-but-not-important gives us an adrenaline shot, makes us feel productive, but is actually a waste of time. Make sure your social media is genuinely important to your business by measuring it. Otherwise, social media belongs in quadrant III unless proven otherwise.

Quadrant IV: Time Wasters

The final quadrant is the your-mom-would-know-better quadrant. This is stuff that’s neither urgent nor important. Remember World of Warcraft? Yeah, it’s quadrant IV. Along with Real Housewives, American Idol, and the Twilight movies. Actually, the Twilight movies might even be quadrant V, which is even worse.
Quadrant IV activities should be viewed with extreme suspicion. Some meetings can be quadrant IV. A lot of email is quadrant IV. Posting pictures of kittens on Facebook is neither urgent nor important. And neither is getting stoned and inadvertently eating a wall-hanging after mistaking it for licorice. Next time you feel tempted to do something in quadrant IV, do something useful instead, like recommending the short and useful Quick and Dirty Tips podcasts to all your friends. You’ll strengthen your friendships and do good for the world, all at once.
Look over your to-do list today. Note the quadrant each item falls into. Make your top priorities your quadrant I activities, and do your best to toss in a quadrant II activity or two. Say goodbye to anything in quadrants III or IV. You owe it to yourself to spend your time doing the things that matter!
I’m Stever Robbins. I help people orient their jobs and lives around what’s most important, not simply what’s urgent. If you want to know more, visit
Work Less, Do More, and have a Great Life!
- See more at: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/productivity/organization/how-prioritize-your-life?page=all#sthash.Am0msHHo.dpuf
Is it going to be the answer for me to work less , do more and have a great life ! I'll keep you posted :) stay tuned


We all like to be over-achievers! Someone says, “achieve,” and we jump right to it. We even achieve multiple things at once (I’ll bet you’re listening to this while driving or working out—am I awesomely psychic, or what?). We make lists of projects we have to do. Then each project becomes a collection of to-do items. We add those to our to-do list. Pretty soon, we have more to-do items than Imelda Marcos has shoes—and Imelda has a lot of shoes.
It’s not easy being her. Imagine being invited to a function. She has a choice of 3,487 pairs of shoes she might wear. How does she decide? Does she organize by color? By how much toe is visible? By number of sequins? My pal Bernice would approve. Or by topological shape? Her boyfriend Melvin would love that. Or how many countries she visited in a given pair? Jet-setting Europa would go wild. It’s too hard a problem. Some theoretical mathematicians speculate solving it will take longer than the lifetime of the universe (just ask Math Dude).
Fortunately, your to-do list is a lot more manageable than Imelda’s closet. Today’s episode is a tribute to the late Steven Covey. He was the author of 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and he recently passed away at the age of much-older-than-me. I don’t know if he invented it, but he certainly popularized one way to think about choosing tasks to do. Here are some tips based upon his wisdom:

Urgency and Importance Are Different

Stephen Covey noticed that we decide a to-do is high priority in two different ways. The first is urgency. Something is urgent if it has to be done now for some reason. The dog is running in circles, crossing its legs, making whimpering noises that mean “Take me for a walk or grandma’s antique carpet is goin’ down.” Delay is not an option.
Other to-dos become high priority because they’re important. Sending in your mortgage payment, for example, needs to be done or the bank will repossess your house. Sending in that payment is high priority. (Of course, some banks repossess your house even if you don’t have a mortgage! Banking is FUN!)

Prioritize Using an Urgent/Important Grid

Make your life easier with a 2x2 grid. Label the rows Important and Not Important. Label the vertical columns Urgent and Not Urgent. Finally, label the upper left quadrant 1, the upper right quadrant 2, the lower left quadrant 3, and the lower right quadrant 4. Each quadrant is a different combination of urgent and important.

Urgent Not Urgent
Important I II
Not Important III IV
When setting priorities, decide which quadrant your activity belongs in. Then use the quadrant to prioritize the activity.

Quadrant I: Omigosh!

Quadrant I contains the urgent and important. It’s the quadrant of Omigosh-hand-me-the-fire-extinguisher. This stuff needs doing, and it needs doing now. Your top priority will be quadrant I activities. When your wife/girlfriend/surrogate baby mama/polyamorous family partner says “The contractions are two minutes apart,” it’s time to shut down World of Warcraft and head to the hospital. And no, you don’t have time to finish your current campaign first.

Quadrant II: Awesomeness

Quadrant II contains the important-but-not-urgent. It’s the quadrant of Becoming Awesome. Most of the things we need to do to become awesome are important, but not urgent. Typical activities that belong in quadrant II would include doing long-term planning, taking classes, spending time with your boyfriend, girlfriend, husband, wife, spousal equivalent, or polyamorous family unit.
Quadrant II is where most personal development activities happen: understanding your deepest values so you can orient your life around them, giving yourself true rest and relaxation so you are in top form, and recaulking the bathtub so the grout doesn’t grow legs and attack you in your sleep.
These are your next priority items, right after quadrant I. Sometimes, these can be even higher priority. If you live your life in quadrant I, always embroiled in urgent emergencies, you must visit quadrant II to create the infrastructure that will handle emergencies before they become urgent. Quadrant II is where you get the highest leverage and biggest boost to your life. It’s where you do prevention, redesign systems, and listen to the Get-it-Done Guy podcast (obviously).
Quadrant II also includes non-work stuff like building friendships, deepening ties with your family, and pursuing spirituality, meaning, and legacy. Those are rarely urgent, but they’re the most important parts of life. Do them now! Don’t wait until they become urgent.

Quadrant III: Social Media

Quadrant III is the quadrant of temptation. These are things that aren’t important, but they sure are urgent. When Bernice gets a bucket of chocolate-covered ice cream bars, I suddenly find myself in a state of near panic. “What if they melt while they’re sitting in the lunch room? I’m pretty sure the freezer isn’t working right. We have to eat these before they melt. It’s absolutely vital!”
Not-quite-emergencies often fall into quadrant III. Like social media. “Someone on Twitter just said our product sucks!!! We have to respond to this before it blows up!” Well isn’t that just a kick in the rubber parts?
It’s urgent! After all, in the 21st century, it’s all about being in conversation with our customers. But is it really important? Say you have 10 million customers and only 20,000 Twitter followers. Of the 20,000, 3 are watching their Twitter feed at the moment, because all the rest are too busy playing World of Warcraft. Doing things that are urgent-but-not-important gives us an adrenaline shot, makes us feel productive, but is actually a waste of time. Make sure your social media is genuinely important to your business by measuring it. Otherwise, social media belongs in quadrant III unless proven otherwise.

Quadrant IV: Time Wasters

The final quadrant is the your-mom-would-know-better quadrant. This is stuff that’s neither urgent nor important. Remember World of Warcraft? Yeah, it’s quadrant IV. Along with Real Housewives, American Idol, and the Twilight movies. Actually, the Twilight movies might even be quadrant V, which is even worse.
Quadrant IV activities should be viewed with extreme suspicion. Some meetings can be quadrant IV. A lot of email is quadrant IV. Posting pictures of kittens on Facebook is neither urgent nor important. And neither is getting stoned and inadvertently eating a wall-hanging after mistaking it for licorice. Next time you feel tempted to do something in quadrant IV, do something useful instead, like recommending the short and useful Quick and Dirty Tips podcasts to all your friends. You’ll strengthen your friendships and do good for the world, all at once.
Look over your to-do list today. Note the quadrant each item falls into. Make your top priorities your quadrant I activities, and do your best to toss in a quadrant II activity or two. Say goodbye to anything in quadrants III or IV. You owe it to yourself to spend your time doing the things that matter!
I’m Stever Robbins. I help people orient their jobs and lives around what’s most important, not simply what’s urgent. If you want to know more, visit
Work Less, Do More, and have a Great Life!
- See more at: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/productivity/organization/how-prioritize-your-life?page=all#sthash.Am0msHHo.dpuf
We all like to be over-achievers! Someone says, “achieve,” and we jump right to it. We even achieve multiple things at once (I’ll bet you’re listening to this while driving or working out—am I awesomely psychic, or what?). We make lists of projects we have to do. Then each project becomes a collection of to-do items. We add those to our to-do list. Pretty soon, we have more to-do items than Imelda Marcos has shoes—and Imelda has a lot of shoes.
It’s not easy being her. Imagine being invited to a function. She has a choice of 3,487 pairs of shoes she might wear. How does she decide? Does she organize by color? By how much toe is visible? By number of sequins? My pal Bernice would approve. Or by topological shape? Her boyfriend Melvin would love that. Or how many countries she visited in a given pair? Jet-setting Europa would go wild. It’s too hard a problem. Some theoretical mathematicians speculate solving it will take longer than the lifetime of the universe (just ask Math Dude).
Fortunately, your to-do list is a lot more manageable than Imelda’s closet. Today’s episode is a tribute to the late Steven Covey. He was the author of 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and he recently passed away at the age of much-older-than-me. I don’t know if he invented it, but he certainly popularized one way to think about choosing tasks to do. Here are some tips based upon his wisdom:

Urgency and Importance Are Different

Stephen Covey noticed that we decide a to-do is high priority in two different ways. The first is urgency. Something is urgent if it has to be done now for some reason. The dog is running in circles, crossing its legs, making whimpering noises that mean “Take me for a walk or grandma’s antique carpet is goin’ down.” Delay is not an option.
Other to-dos become high priority because they’re important. Sending in your mortgage payment, for example, needs to be done or the bank will repossess your house. Sending in that payment is high priority. (Of course, some banks repossess your house even if you don’t have a mortgage! Banking is FUN!)

Prioritize Using an Urgent/Important Grid

Make your life easier with a 2x2 grid. Label the rows Important and Not Important. Label the vertical columns Urgent and Not Urgent. Finally, label the upper left quadrant 1, the upper right quadrant 2, the lower left quadrant 3, and the lower right quadrant 4. Each quadrant is a different combination of urgent and important.

Urgent Not Urgent
Important I II
Not Important III IV
When setting priorities, decide which quadrant your activity belongs in. Then use the quadrant to prioritize the activity.

Quadrant I: Omigosh!

Quadrant I contains the urgent and important. It’s the quadrant of Omigosh-hand-me-the-fire-extinguisher. This stuff needs doing, and it needs doing now. Your top priority will be quadrant I activities. When your wife/girlfriend/surrogate baby mama/polyamorous family partner says “The contractions are two minutes apart,” it’s time to shut down World of Warcraft and head to the hospital. And no, you don’t have time to finish your current campaign first.

Quadrant II: Awesomeness

Quadrant II contains the important-but-not-urgent. It’s the quadrant of Becoming Awesome. Most of the things we need to do to become awesome are important, but not urgent. Typical activities that belong in quadrant II would include doing long-term planning, taking classes, spending time with your boyfriend, girlfriend, husband, wife, spousal equivalent, or polyamorous family unit.
Quadrant II is where most personal development activities happen: understanding your deepest values so you can orient your life around them, giving yourself true rest and relaxation so you are in top form, and recaulking the bathtub so the grout doesn’t grow legs and attack you in your sleep.
These are your next priority items, right after quadrant I. Sometimes, these can be even higher priority. If you live your life in quadrant I, always embroiled in urgent emergencies, you must visit quadrant II to create the infrastructure that will handle emergencies before they become urgent. Quadrant II is where you get the highest leverage and biggest boost to your life. It’s where you do prevention, redesign systems, and listen to the Get-it-Done Guy podcast (obviously).
Quadrant II also includes non-work stuff like building friendships, deepening ties with your family, and pursuing spirituality, meaning, and legacy. Those are rarely urgent, but they’re the most important parts of life. Do them now! Don’t wait until they become urgent.

Quadrant III: Social Media

Quadrant III is the quadrant of temptation. These are things that aren’t important, but they sure are urgent. When Bernice gets a bucket of chocolate-covered ice cream bars, I suddenly find myself in a state of near panic. “What if they melt while they’re sitting in the lunch room? I’m pretty sure the freezer isn’t working right. We have to eat these before they melt. It’s absolutely vital!”
Not-quite-emergencies often fall into quadrant III. Like social media. “Someone on Twitter just said our product sucks!!! We have to respond to this before it blows up!” Well isn’t that just a kick in the rubber parts?
It’s urgent! After all, in the 21st century, it’s all about being in conversation with our customers. But is it really important? Say you have 10 million customers and only 20,000 Twitter followers. Of the 20,000, 3 are watching their Twitter feed at the moment, because all the rest are too busy playing World of Warcraft. Doing things that are urgent-but-not-important gives us an adrenaline shot, makes us feel productive, but is actually a waste of time. Make sure your social media is genuinely important to your business by measuring it. Otherwise, social media belongs in quadrant III unless proven otherwise.

Quadrant IV: Time Wasters

The final quadrant is the your-mom-would-know-better quadrant. This is stuff that’s neither urgent nor important. Remember World of Warcraft? Yeah, it’s quadrant IV. Along with Real Housewives, American Idol, and the Twilight movies. Actually, the Twilight movies might even be quadrant V, which is even worse.
Quadrant IV activities should be viewed with extreme suspicion. Some meetings can be quadrant IV. A lot of email is quadrant IV. Posting pictures of kittens on Facebook is neither urgent nor important. And neither is getting stoned and inadvertently eating a wall-hanging after mistaking it for licorice. Next time you feel tempted to do something in quadrant IV, do something useful instead, like recommending the short and useful Quick and Dirty Tips podcasts to all your friends. You’ll strengthen your friendships and do good for the world, all at once.
Look over your to-do list today. Note the quadrant each item falls into. Make your top priorities your quadrant I activities, and do your best to toss in a quadrant II activity or two. Say goodbye to anything in quadrants III or IV. You owe it to yourself to spend your time doing the things that matter!
I’m Stever Robbins. I help people orient their jobs and lives around what’s most important, not simply what’s urgent. If you want to know more, visit
Work Less, Do More, and have a Great Life!
- See more at: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/productivity/organization/how-prioritize-your-life?page=all#sthash.Am0msHHo.dpuf
We all like to be over-achievers! Someone says, “achieve,” and we jump right to it. We even achieve multiple things at once (I’ll bet you’re listening to this while driving or working out—am I awesomely psychic, or what?). We make lists of projects we have to do. Then each project becomes a collection of to-do items. We add those to our to-do list. Pretty soon, we have more to-do items than Imelda Marcos has shoes—and Imelda has a lot of shoes.
It’s not easy being her. Imagine being invited to a function. She has a choice of 3,487 pairs of shoes she might wear. How does she decide? Does she organize by color? By how much toe is visible? By number of sequins? My pal Bernice would approve. Or by topological shape? Her boyfriend Melvin would love that. Or how many countries she visited in a given pair? Jet-setting Europa would go wild. It’s too hard a problem. Some theoretical mathematicians speculate solving it will take longer than the lifetime of the universe (just ask Math Dude).
Fortunately, your to-do list is a lot more manageable than Imelda’s closet. Today’s episode is a tribute to the late Steven Covey. He was the author of 7 Habits of Highly Effective People and he recently passed away at the age of much-older-than-me. I don’t know if he invented it, but he certainly popularized one way to think about choosing tasks to do. Here are some tips based upon his wisdom:

Urgency and Importance Are Different

Stephen Covey noticed that we decide a to-do is high priority in two different ways. The first is urgency. Something is urgent if it has to be done now for some reason. The dog is running in circles, crossing its legs, making whimpering noises that mean “Take me for a walk or grandma’s antique carpet is goin’ down.” Delay is not an option.
Other to-dos become high priority because they’re important. Sending in your mortgage payment, for example, needs to be done or the bank will repossess your house. Sending in that payment is high priority. (Of course, some banks repossess your house even if you don’t have a mortgage! Banking is FUN!)

Prioritize Using an Urgent/Important Grid

Make your life easier with a 2x2 grid. Label the rows Important and Not Important. Label the vertical columns Urgent and Not Urgent. Finally, label the upper left quadrant 1, the upper right quadrant 2, the lower left quadrant 3, and the lower right quadrant 4. Each quadrant is a different combination of urgent and important.

Urgent Not Urgent
Important I II
Not Important III IV
When setting priorities, decide which quadrant your activity belongs in. Then use the quadrant to prioritize the activity.

Quadrant I: Omigosh!

Quadrant I contains the urgent and important. It’s the quadrant of Omigosh-hand-me-the-fire-extinguisher. This stuff needs doing, and it needs doing now. Your top priority will be quadrant I activities. When your wife/girlfriend/surrogate baby mama/polyamorous family partner says “The contractions are two minutes apart,” it’s time to shut down World of Warcraft and head to the hospital. And no, you don’t have time to finish your current campaign first.

Quadrant II: Awesomeness

Quadrant II contains the important-but-not-urgent. It’s the quadrant of Becoming Awesome. Most of the things we need to do to become awesome are important, but not urgent. Typical activities that belong in quadrant II would include doing long-term planning, taking classes, spending time with your boyfriend, girlfriend, husband, wife, spousal equivalent, or polyamorous family unit.
Quadrant II is where most personal development activities happen: understanding your deepest values so you can orient your life around them, giving yourself true rest and relaxation so you are in top form, and recaulking the bathtub so the grout doesn’t grow legs and attack you in your sleep.
These are your next priority items, right after quadrant I. Sometimes, these can be even higher priority. If you live your life in quadrant I, always embroiled in urgent emergencies, you must visit quadrant II to create the infrastructure that will handle emergencies before they become urgent. Quadrant II is where you get the highest leverage and biggest boost to your life. It’s where you do prevention, redesign systems, and listen to the Get-it-Done Guy podcast (obviously).
Quadrant II also includes non-work stuff like building friendships, deepening ties with your family, and pursuing spirituality, meaning, and legacy. Those are rarely urgent, but they’re the most important parts of life. Do them now! Don’t wait until they become urgent.

Quadrant III: Social Media

Quadrant III is the quadrant of temptation. These are things that aren’t important, but they sure are urgent. When Bernice gets a bucket of chocolate-covered ice cream bars, I suddenly find myself in a state of near panic. “What if they melt while they’re sitting in the lunch room? I’m pretty sure the freezer isn’t working right. We have to eat these before they melt. It’s absolutely vital!”
Not-quite-emergencies often fall into quadrant III. Like social media. “Someone on Twitter just said our product sucks!!! We have to respond to this before it blows up!” Well isn’t that just a kick in the rubber parts?
It’s urgent! After all, in the 21st century, it’s all about being in conversation with our customers. But is it really important? Say you have 10 million customers and only 20,000 Twitter followers. Of the 20,000, 3 are watching their Twitter feed at the moment, because all the rest are too busy playing World of Warcraft. Doing things that are urgent-but-not-important gives us an adrenaline shot, makes us feel productive, but is actually a waste of time. Make sure your social media is genuinely important to your business by measuring it. Otherwise, social media belongs in quadrant III unless proven otherwise.

Quadrant IV: Time Wasters

The final quadrant is the your-mom-would-know-better quadrant. This is stuff that’s neither urgent nor important. Remember World of Warcraft? Yeah, it’s quadrant IV. Along with Real Housewives, American Idol, and the Twilight movies. Actually, the Twilight movies might even be quadrant V, which is even worse.
Quadrant IV activities should be viewed with extreme suspicion. Some meetings can be quadrant IV. A lot of email is quadrant IV. Posting pictures of kittens on Facebook is neither urgent nor important. And neither is getting stoned and inadvertently eating a wall-hanging after mistaking it for licorice. Next time you feel tempted to do something in quadrant IV, do something useful instead, like recommending the short and useful Quick and Dirty Tips podcasts to all your friends. You’ll strengthen your friendships and do good for the world, all at once.
Look over your to-do list today. Note the quadrant each item falls into. Make your top priorities your quadrant I activities, and do your best to toss in a quadrant II activity or two. Say goodbye to anything in quadrants III or IV. You owe it to yourself to spend your time doing the things that matter!
I’m Stever Robbins. I help people orient their jobs and lives around what’s most important, not simply what’s urgent. If you want to know more, visit
Work Less, Do More, and have a Great Life!
- See more at: http://www.quickanddirtytips.com/productivity/organization/how-prioritize-your-life?page=all#sthash.Am0msHHo.dpuf

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

Is your time management as awful as mine !



‘Apologies for this uber late reply! It’s been a busy week … I’ll write a proper msg ASAP I promise’   
After more than a week, this is all what I wrote to my colleague who is patiently waiting for some info ! Sounds familiar! Read along :) 
I ,like most of you, would love to be an over-achiever! Someone says, “achieve,” and we jump right to it. We live in a time that cheers multi-tasking (I bet you are reading this blog whilst listening to and /watching something else at once!). I cram lists of things I want to do. Then each project becomes a collection of to-do items. Not long afterwards, I’ll cram more to-do items than there are explosions in Baghdad —and Baghdad has a lot of explosions trust me on this one.
Fortunately, your/my to-do list is far more manageable than Iraqi politics. Here is what  Steven Covey said on prioritising your tasks. He is the author of  7 Habits of Highly Effective People.
Urgency and Importance Are Different
Stephen Covey noticed that we decide a to-do is high priority in two different ways. The first is where delay is not an option aka its urgent. Other to-dos become high priority because they’re important. I cant think of examples right now but you got the idea.
Prioritize Using an Urgent/Important Grid
Make your life easier with a 2x2 grid. When setting priorities, decide which quadrant your activity belongs in. Then use the quadrant to prioritize the activity.

Urgent
Not Urgent
Important
I
II
Not Important
III
IV
Quadrant I: OMG!
Quadrant I contains the urgent and important. It’s the quadrant of Omigosh-hand-me-the-fire-extinguisher. This stuff needs doing, and it needs doing now. Your top priority will be quadrant I activities.
Quadrant II: Awesome  
Quadrant II contains the important-but-not-urgent. It’s the quadrant of Becoming Awesome. Most of the things we need to do to become awesome are important, but not urgent. Typical activities that belong in quadrant II would include doing long-term planning, taking classes, spending time with family. we need to aim to make most of our tasks lie in this quadrant .
Quadrant III: Social Media
Quadrant III is the quadrant of temptation. These are things that aren’t important, but they sure are urgent.  Doing things that are urgent-but-not-important gives us an adrenaline shot, makes us feel productive, but is actually a waste of time.
Quadrant IV: Time Wasters
The final quadrant is the you-know-better quadrant. This is stuff that’s neither urgent nor important.


Look over your to-do list today. Note the quadrant each item falls into. Make your top priorities your quadrant I activities, and do your best to toss in a quadrant II activity. Say goodbye to anything in quadrants III or IV.
You owe it to yourself to spend your time doing the things that matter!

 

Thursday, October 3, 2013

Why am I not Polish !



Sometimes I honestly wish  I cant understand English!

You know when you’re sitting in a Starbucks so packed, trying to enjoy your coffee but whether you want it or not , you‘re doomed to hear other people’s conversations .. 

Well , the other day the couple next to me was literally fighting ! kid you not ..of course , no guy can win an argument with an angry lady so after 20 min or so , the man finally decided to leave I was so happy that for a second I was really tempted  it to stand on my chair and do the standard Arabic Hallelujah (not that I know how to -embarrassing- but its not that easy It needs well trained vocal cords :P)  have a quick look if you're interested http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sXnTk8cMy1A ...and just to make things more exciting ,I  swear the coffee tasted funny that day ! awful day :/  maybe I should have stood on the chair ;) 

Tuesday, October 1, 2013

A highly classifed birthday gift !

Hey there loyal readers from around the globe :)
hope you are all doing superb ;)
So it was my aunt's Birthday last weekend
I was quite excited about it partly because my mum was in the UK last week for an ultra short visit


and partly because of what I planned to do for my aunt for her birthday; one word ....drums please .....Botox !
I didnt know how much stigma my family associates with such treatment... my aunt was very happy about it but made it clear that I have to do it before my uncle comes home! 
I was genuinely peeved to learn that my mum had actually had it done before , mainly because I wasn't told :/ ok maybe I don't have the right to feel so but I still did
Anyway so my aunt and my mum are officially my first two clients since I got my botox license..isnt that funny ? :P
we had a good laugh , a delicious meal , they both liked what they got but most importantly my uncle knew nothing about it ;)

It made me think of the time when I ll be needing Botox ..I am already dreading it :P

Ok that is a bit of a random post really!but I m posting it anyway , you wont mind that right ?!

Sunday, September 29, 2013

Making Peace is a Marathon !


The city of Beirut, Lebanon, has seen its share of tragedy, as a seat of Lebanon's long-running civil war (1975-1990) and the Israeli-Lebanese conflict that came to a head in 2006. But in 2003, May El-Khalil, a local sports official, decided: It's time to start a marathon, open to all, as an antidote to sectarianism.I find what she does for a living very inspiring ..take a look :)

P.S. I found the first 30 seconds quite tedious , her accent a bit irritating , and her face is so plastic (obviously she had had tons of plastic surgeries done but you will come to know why ) its worth watching ... Enjoy


http://www.ted.com/talks/may_el_khalil_making_peace_is_a_marathon.html